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World Record for a Sheila Hicks Tapestry

Result EUR687,500
Published on , by Anne Doridou-Heim
Auction on 05 December 2022 - 20:00 (CET) - 3, rue Rossini - 75009 Paris

A world record for this special commissioned tapestry illustrating the enchanting world Hicks creates with her materials.

Sheila Hicks (b. 1934), Fugue, 1969-1970, silk, flax, cotton, assemblage mounted... World Record for a Sheila Hicks Tapestry

Sheila Hicks (b. 1934), Fugue, 1969-1970, silk, flax, cotton, assemblage mounted on eight panels, 275 x 512 cm/108.3 x 202 in.
Result: €687,500

Created in 1969 for the Rothschild Bank headquarters in Paris, the unique Fugue—an assemblage of 166 hanks of flax partially sheathed in colored silk on stretched linen panels—set a substantial world record (source: Artnet) selling for €687,500. Since her 2018 retrospective at the Centre Pompidou, the American artist Sheila Hicks (b. 1934) has turned up everywhere, quietly but surely weaving her highly successful magic. Her ever-plentiful commissions acclaim a career that started when Hicks was a student of the Bauhaus master Joseph Albers and met his wife Anni: a textile artist who had the first-ever solo exhibition at MoMA in this specialty. During a trip to South America, Hicks discovered textile practices inspired by pre-Columbian America and was inspired to create her first woven pieces. She has worked consistently since the late 1950s, alternating between the small formats she produces daily with large-scale works, all characterized by remarkable richness and depth. Her tactile, lively work is unique, and occupies a singular position in the art of our time: clearly the secret of its appeal.

Monday 05 December 2022 - 20:00 (CET) - Live
3, rue Rossini - 75009 Paris
Millon
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Preferring textiles to paints, Sheila Hicks wove La Fugue, a fabric bas-relief, for the Rothschild Bank’s Parisian headquarters.

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